Friday, May 13, 2016

5 Dishes Every Nigerian Love [Photos]

Hello Kitchen mates and lovers, today we want to take a look at some Nigerian dishes every Nigerian man or woman doesn’t joke with irrespective of tribe, class or financial status. These five dishes we are about to reveal are a must eat for every Nigerian at least thrice in a week.

Without wasting much time, let’s go straight to the dishes:


Beans porridge served with fried ripe plantain

Beans:

Yoruba people call it ewa. Beans is one of the regular special delicacies for every true Nigerian man or woman, and can be prepared in so many ways to spice it up, depending on the household and their taste. Some household prefer it watery, while others prefer it dry-cooked. Some household combine it with yam to make a porridge, while others combine it with ripe plantain. Some people serve the beans with garri (cassava flour) while others serve it vegetable, so it all depends on taste and choice, but one thing is for sure; beans is no doubt one of the every-Nigerian man’s delicacies. But please o, don’t serve beans at your party or ceremony, and don’t ask me why.


Yam porridge served with stew and fried chicken


Yam:
Yam is another food that every Nigerian eats without discrimination. Just like beans, yam can be prepared in so many ways, which includes:

- sliced, fried and served with fried egg, vegetable or tomato stew

- cooked as a porridge with vegetable (ugu, efo, green, etc)

- cooked as porridge with beans and maybe vegetable

- roasted and served with red oil, vegetable, pepper and kpomo (special boiled cow skin)

So if you are married to a Nigerian man and you want him to be happy, please do serve him yam once in a while to remind him of his dear country Nigeria.


Jollof rice served with fried chicken


Rice:
Rice is not just every Nigerian’s food, but everybody’s food; including the whites, the Indians, Arabs and Chinese, but then, how it is prepared matters a lot, which is what differentiates it.

In Nigeria, rice is prepared in so many delicious ways, which includes:

- Jollof: Nigerians don’t joke with jollof rice no matter their status in the society, so if you want to live in peace with a Nigerian man, please don’t joke with his or her jollof rice because it is so dear to them. A Nigerian party can never be complete without a jollof rice, and Nigerian children will never be satisfied with your party if you refuse to serve them a plate of jollof rice with a bottle of soft drink; Fanta, Coca-Cola, Pepsi or Mirinda, forget about malt drink; Nigerian kids prefer the colas.

- white rice & stew: have you ever had a taste of real Nigerian white rice & stew? I am sure if you do, you will denounce your country’s citizenship for Nigeria lol. Joke apart, there is no other special way to serve rice than with a Nigerian stew & fried chicken. I bet you will bite off your fingers if you taste a well-prepared Nigerian white rice & stew.

- fried rice: you can joke with any other thing, but don’t joke with a Nigerian’s fried rice lol. This is no doubt one of the favorites ways Nigerians enjoy eating rice, especially the kids.

So if you are married to a Nigerian man as a foreign woman, and you want him to feel like he’s married to his village woman, please go and learn to prepare the real Nigerian white rice and stew because your Nigerian husband will so appreciate it.


Eba served with eforiro soup

Garri:
Just like water, garri no get enemy for Nigeria. Garri is one of the most popular local Nigerian food consumed by virtually all Nigerians irrespective of tribe, academic qualification, social and financial status. If you see a Nigerian man or woman that doesn’t eat or consume garri, please check his or her paternity well, maybe he’s from Ghana lol.

Over the years, garri has formed a special part of Nigerian household, such that no family can go without garri  for a whole week. One thing that makes garri a unique food in Nigeria is the fact that it can be consumed in so many ways:

As eba: prepared with hot water, and served with any Nigerian soup (egusi soup, okra soup, ogbono soup, eforiro soup, uha soup, vegetable soup, afang soup, white soup or bitter leaf soup). The only close replacement of eba  in Nigeria is pounded yam.

- As drinkable garri: Every Nigerian who schooled in Nigeria and lived in the Nigerian school hostel or dormitory must relate to this. Nothing can be as sweet as drinking garri soaked in chilled water with sugar, fried groundnut and maybe chocolate (Milo), the sweet sensation is so unforgettable for any Nigerian who grew up in Nigeria. If you are a Nigerian and you didn’t or haven’t drank garri before, then we need to revoke your Nigerian citizenship ASAP! Lol



Plantain served with fish and special prepared red oil


Plantain: 
How can a Nigerian reject plantain? Just like Cameroonians, Nigerians too don’t joke with plantain, and no wonder plantain is now costly at the local Nigerian market. In Nigeria, plantain serve so many purposes and form a part of many Nigerian delicacies.

Some of the ways Nigerians consume plantain include:

When it is ripe
-  fried and served with jollof or white rice delicacy

- fried and served with vegetable, fried egg & fresh tomato, and served with tea in the morning as breakfast. Some household combine it with fried yam or potato.

- cooked with beans as porridge

- fried separately and served with well cooked beans delicacy

- roasted whole and served with either red oil, pepper and leaf as roasted plantain

When it is not ripe
fried and served as plantain chips

- roasted and served with red oil, pepper and leaf

- cooked alone as plantain porridge, don’t forget to add some vegetables depending on your choice

- boiled and served with red oil or stew

The above foods or dishes are no doubt, the five most popular food every Nigerian man or woman eats at least twice a week, so if you are in any way married to a Nigerian man as a foreign woman, please don’t forget to prepare these dishes once in a while for him, and I am very sure that he will be so pleased to have you as his lovely wife.

Nigeriakitchen, our food|our pride

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